Kakegawa City Official Website

LinksEnquiriesSite map
English한국어中文简体字中文繁體字Portugues日本語

Sightseeing Spots

Castles in Kakegawa

The three castles located in Kakegawa City were strategic points in the battles that took place in the Enshu area in the Warring States Period.

History and culture were cultivated as Kakegawa flourished as a castle town and post station on the Tokaido Road.

Kakegawa Castle

Kakegawa Castle was built by the Imagawa clan, and for ten years from 1590 was ruled by Yamauchi Kazutoyo, who was famous for the anecdote of having a good wife who supported her husband's success in battles. During this time the castle tower was built and the castle town was constructed.

The castle's beauty earned it the title of the finest castle in the Tokai area, and in April 1994 it became the first castle in Japan to be restored to its original state using a wooden construction.

From the castle watchtower the beautiful town of Kakegawa surrounded by nature that the lords of the castle would look out upon spreads before you and brings to mind historical scenes from the Warring States Period.

Kakegawa Castle

Takatenjin Castle Ruins (A designated National Historic Site)

The remnants of history lie here.

Surrounded by dense cedar and cypress, the stone steps, dark but for the play of sunlight through the trees pass time quietly in an air of Warring State Period romanticism.

It was said that whoever controls Takatenjin Castle controls the area of Enshu, and Tokugawa and Takeda fought their largest battle of life or death over the castle. It is also said to be famous for being impenetrable.

Even now, the castle still commemorates the history of those who lived long ago, like Takeda Shingen, Takeda Katsuyori and Tokugawa Ieyasu.

Takatenjin Castle Ruins (A designated National Historic Site)

Yokosuka Castle Ruins (A designated National Historic Site)

At the end of the Warring States Period, Tokugawa Ieyasu ordered Osuga Yasutaka to build the castle in order to take over Takatenjin Castle that had been taken by the Takeda clan.

The castle standing on a hill had both medieval and modern characteristics and as it had front gates on both the east and west sides it was said to be a double-ended castle. Today it is a historic park that is used as a resting space.

Yokosuka Castle Ruins (A designated National Historic Site)

Places where you can learn about Kakegawa City's history and culture.

You can feel the history and traditional culture of Kakegawa City, which flourished as a post station and castle town.

Ninomaru Chaya

The Ninomaru Tea Room is in the traditional sukiya style and was built to look up to Kakegawa Castle tower.

It is widely used as a place to enjoy traditional tea culture while gazing out over a Japanese garden and Kakegawa Castle goten palace.

Places where you can learn about Kakegawa City's history and culture.

Kakegawa Ninomaru Museum of Art

Kakegawa Ninomaru Museum of Art was opened in April 1998 with the Kinoshita Collection of mainly miniature artifacts such as smoking implements and the Suzuki Collection of modern Japanese-style works. The Kinoshita Collection features approximately 2,300 items including inro cases, sword fittings and calligraphic works and paintings and many of the very best of smoking implements.

The museum is used as a base for local arts and culture activities and exhibits miniature artifacts and modern Japanese works by active people in their local places.

Kakegawa Ninomaru Museum of Art

Nissaka-Shuku, Kawasaka-Ya

A hatago inn for travelers at the Nissaka-Shuku on the Fifty-three Stages of the Tokaido Road, this building is one of the very few remaining that gives a glimpse of the Edo Period.

It is said that the building of exquisite timberwork and detailed latticework was constructed by a master carpenter brought from Edo. The sub-honjin inn was used by high ranking samurai and continued to operate until 1870.

Nissaka-Shuku, Kawasaka-Ya

Night Crying Stone (Sayo-no-Nakayama)

It is said that long ago a pregnant woman was robbed and killed by bandits while crossing the Nakayama Pass. Villagers found the dead woman's crying baby that had just been born. The mother's spirit entered a stone at the body's side and it is said that this stone cries at night.

The child was lovingly brought up and avenged his mother's murder. Presently the stone lies at the side of the Nakayama Tunnel, and there is also a similar stone enshrined at Kyuenji Temple which is associated with the legend.

Night Crying Stone (Sayo-no-Nakayama)

Yayoi Yoshioka Memorial Museum

This museum was built in praise of the achievements of Yayoi Yoshioka, a local heroine from the old Daito Town of Kakegawa City. Yoshioka founded the Tokyo Women's Medical University and contributed greatly to Japan's modern medical history.

The house where she was born, its gate house and storehouse have been moved to and rebuilt in the grounds of the museum and there are displays that commemorate that period in history.

Yayoi Yoshioka Memorial Museum

Matsumoto Kamejiro Park

Matsumoto Kamejiro was born in Daito in 1866 and was a teacher at Peking University in China.

Among the students he taught were those who would become leaders in China, including the writer Lu Xun and the politicians Guo Moruo and Zhou Enlai. The spot of the house where he was born has been turned into a park and there is a monument there bearing the writing of the late Yasushi Inoue, one of Japan's prolific writers.

Matsumoto Kamejiro Park

Shimizu-tei Garden

The Shimizu family was a shipping agent in the Genroku Era of the Edo Period (1688-1704) and the family thrived as the appointed purveyor to the domain.

It is said that the garden that stretches from the south of the residence was constructed in the mid-Edo Period and it is famous for its beautiful and clear spring water pond that was selected as one of Shizuoka Prefecture's 100 most beautiful water spots.

You can also enjoy looking out over the beautiful garden while drinking tea at Yusui-tei.

Shimizu-tei Garden

Related link